Publications

Troublesome Investment. The Belarusian Nuclear Power Plant in Astravyets

When Belarus embarked on the construction of its first nuclear power plant in Astravyets in 2012, the official objective was to significantly reduce the share played by imported Russian gas in the country’s electricity production.

OSW Studies
2018-07-09
Joanna Hyndle-Hussein
Szymon Kardaś
Kamil Kłysiński

Russia and Belarus had been unable to reach an agreement concerning co-operation in the oil sector. On 10 October a compromise was reached.

Analyses
2016-10-12
Kamil Kłysiński
Szymon Kardaś

The Parliament of Lithuania has appealed to the government to take action to halt the construction of the Astravyets nuclear power plant in Belarus.

Analyses
2016-05-18
Joanna Hyndle-Hussein

During Russian PM Dmitry Medvedev’s working visit to Minsk on 18 July, Russia and Belarus signed a general contract for the construction of a nuclear power plant in Belarus. The signature brought to an end the complex negotiations which had been underway since January 2009 involving the leadership in Minsk, the Russian government and Atomstroyexport, the Russian company that will be the main contractor of the investment.

OSW Commentary
2012-07-23
Kamil Kłysiński
Marek Menkiszak

Belarus generated a surplus at US$1.9 billion in foreign trade in goods and services in the first four months of 2012 as compared to a deficit of US$2.8 billion for the same timeframe a year earlier. Minsk owes this, its highest positive trade balance since 1991, mainly to a significant increase in exports of petroleum products manufactured by the refineries in Navapolatsk and Mazyr.

OSW Commentary
2012-06-19
Kamil Kłysiński
Wojciech Konończuk
On 17 January, a Belarusian-Ukrainian agreement was signed in Kiev on the transit of crude oil via the Odessa-Brody pipeline to the Belarusian refinery in Mazyr. The agreement represents the end of the talks which started last autumn on organising deliveries of oil from Venezuela and Azerbaijan to Belarus as alternatives to Russian oil. The agreement foresees a lower quantity of transmitted oil than originally agreed; any possible increase will depend on the oil prices which Russia will offer Belarus in the immediate future.
Analyses
2011-01-19
At the end of November, Russia took action to block the supply of alternative oil deliveries to Belarus. On 25 November the Latvian-Russian company LatRosTrans, which owns the Ventspils-Navapolatsk pipeline, started emptying technological crude oil from it; this prevents oil from being delivered via this route to the Belarusian refinery in Navapolatsk. On 22 November Transneft, the Russian oil pipeline monopolist, stated that transporting oil from Odessa via Brody to refineries in Mazyr could lead to problems in supplying Russian oil to Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary. Russia’s actions show that Moscow wants to prevent the supply to Belarus of oil from non-Russian sources; it cannot be ruled out that it may even temporarily restrict transit via the southern section of the Druzhba pipeline.
Analyses
2010-12-01
On 8 November, the Belarusian deputy prime minister Uladzimir Siemashka announced that in the second half of this month a test transmission of oil to Belarus via Ukrainian territory will be carried out along the Odessa-Brody pipeline, and then along the southern branch of the Druzhba pipeline. This is the result of an agreement between Belarus and Ukraine on the use of the latter’s pipelines to transport oil to Belarusian refineries. For Kyiv, this is an opportunity to fill the Odessa-Brody pipeline as Russia has stopped using it. Minsk, for its part, has the chance of cheaper transport via an alternative pipeline to Russian oil supplies.
Analyses
2010-11-17
On 16-18 October, the President of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, paid a visit to Minsk during which a contract to deliver Venezuelan crude oil to Belarus over the next three years was signed. The guarantee of an alternative to Russian oil deliveries strengthens Minsk’s position in the face of growing political and economic pressure from the Kremlin.
Analyses
2010-10-20
On 3 September, the deputy head of Gazprom, Andrei Kruglov, stated that from next year the price of gas for Belarus, Moldova and Armenia will be raised to European levels. If this comes about, this would be the final stage in the Russian company’s departure from its policy of giving price discounts to some CIS states. It remains possible that the plan to raise gas prices for Belarus, in connection with the expected resistance from Minsk, may lead to another Russian/Belarusian gas crisis, even more so as relations between both countries have already been tense for several months.
Analyses
2010-09-09

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